The Land of Oz: Graduation

No pressure. It's only the rest of your life.  

If you are an inhabitant of the planet Earth and reside somewhere in the U.S (especially Tuscaloosa), there is a good chance that you know someone who is graduating or has *just* graduated from an institution of learning this month. Whether it's college, high school, tech school, or nursing school, truckloads of young, bright minds are about to burst into the workforce to prove their worth in the business community and attempt to make the world a better place.  

How many you ask? 


For the 2015-2016 school year, Colleges and Universities in the U.S. will hand out an estimated 1.8 million bachelor degrees, 800,000 masters degrees, and 179,000 doctoral degrees. That's a bunch. 

The good news is that in the current long-term outlook, employers will be looking to fill more jobs than there are workers. This usually equates to higher earnings, depending on your chosen profession.  

Here is the bad news: Most new graduates will likely have to go to work in a field not associated with their educational background. This fact will most likely interest parents, who may or may not have picked up the tab on tuition, and who may or may not have a vacancy in their basement.   

Unless your degree involves a handful of professions where there are labor shortages, odds are good that you will be forced (depending on how much student loan money you’ve got concealed under the mattress, or how nice your parent’s basement is) to take a job outside of your intended interest.  

Luckily for myself, it only took about six months after I graduated college before I was offered a job in my field of study. However, this only occurred after I took a job that didn’t even require a college degree.   

But it is important to note that one of the variables that led to the offer of the job I wanted was my performance at that job I obtained in the time frame following my graduation. I honestly had no interest in it.  As it turns out, my prospective employer was more attentive to my work ethic in the job that I didn’t want more than anything else. And I left my supervisor with nothing but positive things to say when they called for a reference.   

The point is that you or someone you know may very well end up in a temporary job leading up to a desired position. And it might not be fun. But if you go into it with a positive attitude and a desire to achieve success regardless of your surroundings, then success will most likely find you. And understand that sometimes finding the job that you want is a journey within itself.   

I tweet insignificant things @ozborn34.            

Derek Osborn is the Executive Director of PRIDE of Tuscaloosa by trade and writer by hobby. He lives in Tuscaloosa with his wife, Lynn, and daughters Savannah and Anica.   

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Derek Osborn

Executive Director at PRIDE of Tuscaloosa, the only  non-profit agency in the Tuscaloosa area that informs and educates the parents, students, and community about the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs.


Lake Tuscaloosa Living (LTL) is the premier community newspaper, covering the great people, places and activities of the area.


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